How I Invest My Money as a Self-Employed Person (Detailed Breakdown!)

Where do I invest my money?

In this article, I want to talk a little bit about the breakdown of my (boring) investment portfolio. I’ll also shed some info on the asset classes involved and what I want to improve or refine further. 

By the end, I’ll share some of my core investing mindsets (or principles, whatever you wanna call them) that I follow closely in my decision-making process.

Have a good read!

Now, a few caveats…

1. The market is dynamic (so is life). Our financial priorities change as we grow older. Hence, I am pretty sure how I invest today will evolve along with time and my priorities in life. 

2. The focus of this discussion will be on my long-term investment portfolio. This means that invested assets will be focused 100% on achieving my financial goal (Financial Independence, or FI). 

They will not be cashed out for other purposes other than portfolio rebalancing. 

3. Money allocated for savings and emergencies will NOT be included in this discussion. This is because there is a high chance that these monies will be used for purposes other than to achieve my financial goals. 

Read my articles on savings and emergency funds HERE and HERE

4. Money allocated for short-term trading will not be included in this discussion. The nature & purpose between trading and investing are extremely different and there is no reason for me to add them to this discussion.

With that in mind, please approach this post with a pinch of salt. Your investment approach and style should be aligned with your own priorities in life, risk profile, and more. 

Do consult a licensed financial planner if you are serious about building your own investment portfolio. I am also working with my personal financial planner and have written about my experience HERE


No Money Lah’s Investment Portfolio + Breakdown Discussion – June 2020

#1 Cash in Hand for Investment Purposes

There are a few reasons why 40% of my portfolio is in the form of cash.

Reason #1: Risk of income fluctuation as a self-employed. 

There are certain months where my income may be less than my intended average figure. 

Hence, at this point in time (June), I have a 3-months cash buffer allocated for my monthly investment routine as you’ll read in this article.

Reason #2: Cash reserved for different opportunities.

We never know what’ll happen in the market tomorrow. 

Especially in this current market condition, I have extra cash reserved to take advantage of any opportunities that may come knocking on the doorstep. 


#2 Stock Market (REITs) – Active Income Investing

How I Invest: Every month, barring nothing special happens, I will pump a specific sum of money into my selected REITs.

When it comes to the stock market, I focus particularly on Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs)

This is the part of my investing routine where I am involved actively to research and study what to invest.

The reasons why I focus on REITs are because REITs’ volatility is generally milder relative to other sectors in the market, and I like the idea of consistent dividend payout from REITs (something like collecting rent as a landlord). 

Simply put, REITs are my niche and it is a sector that I can utilize my thought process & analysis skills with high competence to generate alpha (edge).

What I’d like to refine further: Starting to expose myself more to foreign REITs (ie. Singapore, HK & US REITs) for the 2nd half of 2020.

Note: Click photo to access this article.

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p.s. I am often asked if I feel ‘sayang’ for missing out on all the hot headline stocks. To be honest, I don’t.

For one, I do not have time to study these companies for long-term investment. Secondly, the moment you see a stock appear on the headline, you are probably way too late to join the game.

I focus on my niche and strength, and will not touch something that I am not familiar with. 


#3 Robo-Advisors (StashAway + Wahed) – Automated Passive Investing

How I Invest: Monthly automated debit order.

Yes, I am aware of the risk of overconcentration by just investing in REITs. 

Hence, I am also passively invested in robo-advisors like StashAway and Wahed to diversify my portfolio into ETFs of various industries and other asset classes (ie. Bond, Commodities, Sukuk). 

In terms of risk profile, I am mainly focusing on medium-risk portfolios from both platforms (StashAway: 14% Risk Index, Wahed: Medium Risk Profile).

The beauty of robo-advisors is that I can invest passively at a reasonably lower cost than conventional unit trusts. 

What I’d like to refine further: Nothing.

p.s. Use my: StashAway Referral Code and get 50% off your management fees for 6 months, as well as Wahed Referral Code (Code: YIXCHI1) and get RM10 bonus fund!

Note: Click photo to access this article. 

#4 PRS – Passive Investing

Just to take advantage of tax and government’s previous incentive.

Note: Click photo to access article

#5 Gold – Monthly manual debit order

How I Invest: Manual debit via HelloGold’s Smart Savers program

Personally, I think of Gold as a wealth preservation asset and a correlation hedge against overall market volatility. 

The reason why I choose to stick with HelloGold is that it allows me to be extremely flexible with the purchase amount, whereas other platforms have a minimum purchase of 1g. 

What I’d like to refine further: Increase monthly allocation in Gold, and start to have exposure in Silver in line with the increment of my income in the near future.

Note: Click photo to access article

#6 EPF – Passive Investing

How I Invest: Monthly manual debit order

EPF is an interesting matter to me as a self-employed. This is because unlike normal employment where there is a standard to how much you and your employer will contribute to your EPF, I have to manage my own EPF account.

This is done by opening my own EPF i-Saraan account and manage my own EPF contribution.

What I’d like to refine further: Increase monthly allocation in line with the increment of my income in the near future.


#7 Bitcoin – Not adding any positions 

Presently, most of my bitcoin positions are my unsold positions during my purchase in mid-2017.

They are relatively small as I was lucky enough to sell off the majority of my position nearly at the height of bitcoin’s $20,000 peak by the end of 2017.

That said, I am also eyeing to start increasing my holding on digital currencies moving forward. Just gotta dive in and do some research first.

What I’d like to refine further: Do deeper research into digital currencies.


#8 ASNB – No Luck

Seriously, if you can get your hands on Amanah Saham Fixed Price Funds, get it. 

The consistency of return and the nature of ASNB unit price (fixed at RM1.00/unit) makes it a no-brainer if you are looking to invest passively.

Unfortunately, I never really got much luck to get many units since I’ve written my piece on Amanah Saham last year *sigh*

Note: Click photo to access article.

Context: My Situation

I am 26 this year. As a self-employed, I run this blog and actively organize live REIT Income Investing coaching sessions – both of which I have a lot of fun doing.

In my downtime prior to Covid-19, I am also an International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF) certified table tennis coach (though that stream of income is no more today).

More importantly, I am also passionately working behind the scene to become a full-time funded trader (*fingers crossed*). This part of my life requires a dedicated post, but suffice to say it is a very challenging, yet exciting journey.

I am single and currently living with my family (it’s a blessing). Hence, I am able to reduce my living expenses significantly which enables me to pursue my goals wholeheartedly, while maintaining a respectable savings ratio.

All in all, my situation is likely going to be very different from many people, as I do not have a fixed monthly income. 

Financially, my situation requires me to be extremely disciplined with money. It also pushed me to think 2 to 3 steps ahead in terms of my income streams, which is why you’ll see things like cash buffer in place for my monthly investment routines.


My Investing Mindset + Approaches

1. Create a disciplined financial and investing routine. For me, I review my financials and investments every month-end, so I am always aware of my financial state. 

2. Take time to discover your investment style. Not everyone has the time & commitment to pick individual stocks. Not everyone can invest in volatile businesses. Everyone is different. 

For me, a hybrid routine of active REIT income investing coupled with low-cost passive investing makes the most sense to my personality, time, and commitment. 

3. Foundational skills like how to analyze a financial report is a MUST in active investing. I think there’s really no shortcut here. 

4. A stock investing plan without an exit strategy is NOT a plan. Market and businesses are too dynamic to buy and hold forever. 

5. 99% of headlines are mostly for entertainment purposes. Until you know what you are looking for, headlines and news can be extremely overwhelming. 

p.s. I don’t really care about the hottest stock in town. 

6. Leverage on technology. Low-cost passive investing platforms like StashAway and Wahed helped complement my investment routine so I am always diversified in other industries. 

7. Avoid investing with borrowed money. I avoid leveraged accounts and invest only with the money I have (ie. Cash Upfront account on Rakuten Trade).

8. Learn to make independent investment decisions. I use various resources to help me gather insights, but ultimately, I make my own investment decisions. 

Nothing helps me improve more than taking ownership of how I invest my own wealth. 

9. Focus on the process – keep learning and stay humble. Whenever I feel like I know everything, the market will prove me otherwise. A little humility goes a long way in the market. 

10. In the long run, successful financial goals and investing depend on one’s habits, mindset, and skillsets. And yes, it’ll take time. 


No Money Lah’s Verdict

Oh my, this is a long article! Thanks for reading till the end, and hopefully you find this post an insightful one!

Ultimately, it is crucial for us to acknowledge that investing is a very personal matter. How I invest will likely be very different from you, and there is really no right or wrong approach here.

Either way, personal finance and investing is a life-long journey. Our money and investment routine have to evolve as we step into different stages of life.

Hence, keep learning, stay humble.

p.s. Curious, where do you invest your money in? Feel free to share with me at the comment section below! 

Talk soon! :)


This is an article that I’ve always wanted to write about. In fact, I have several drafts for this topic, yet I never really landed on an approach to this article.

Big thanks to Mr-Stingy’s article on 'How I Invest My Own Money' (check it out!), which has helped me decide how I should approach this topic. You can also check out a similar topic from Ringgit Oh Ringgit HERE.


You Might be Interested: What'd I do If I Were to Start Investing All Over Again?


4 BETTER Ways to Save Money in a Low Interest Rate Environment! (detailed comparison)

Since the Covid-19 pandemic started earlier this year, central banks across the world have been lowering interest rate in hope to spur the economy with increased consumption & borrowings.

On the flip side, under a low interest rate environment, the yield of conventional financial vehicles like Fixed Deposit (FD) are affected negatively. 

In fact, Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM) has just announced the lowering of interest rate from 2% to 1.75% this month (July), which is never seen even during the Global Financial Crisis in 2008/09.

Simply put, savers suffer in this historically low interest rate environment.


The question is obvious:

Is there anywhere we can place or save our money in this low interest rate environment? 

Let’s find out together.

Malaysia's Interest Rate at Historical Low (source: Tradingeconomics)

Firstly, Our Goals & Criteria:

What I intend to achieve with this article is to share what I think are suitable alternatives to FD for most people to place their money.

The main goal here is to seek options that can allow most people to PRESERVE the value of their wealth. 

Hence, please approach this article from a wealth & value preservation mindset, NOT from an investment mindset.

Since we are talking about potential FD alternatives here, there are a few criteria that I consider while planning for this article:

  • #1 The majority exposure of these financial vehicles must be limited to low-risk asset classes.

  • #2 Ideally, we’ll want to have a low barrier of entry to these options. Meaning, we can start even with a small amount of capital.

  • #3 A flexible deposit & withdrawal feature would be a plus point.

  • #4 No troublesome tiering conditions where I must spend up to some amount or swipe my card X times a month to be eligible for the yield. (too mafan)

Now, a huge disclaimer (confirm people will mention): NONE of the options mentioned below are insured by PIDM and NONE of them have guaranteed yield or return. So if that’s your thing, this article is not for you.

With that in mind, let’s start!


1. Money Market Funds

Money Market Funds are mutual funds that typically invest in cash equivalent short-term debt instruments with short maturity (normally around 1 – 2 years, sometimes even shorter).

In other words, Money Market Funds place your money in instruments like government treasuries, corporate, and bank securities. Also, Money Market Funds' managers typically attempt to keep the price of the funds fixed (ie. RM1/unit), so only the yield will fluctuate.

In nature, Money Market Funds are considered lowest in risk within the fixed income asset classes as the short maturity (a.k.a. expiry) of the instruments invested lower the risk of default and reduce exposure to long-term risk in the market.

Generally, yields are paid out in the form of dividends either monthly or quarterly.

Personally, I have most of my money placed with BIMB Dana Al-Fakhim (via BIMB’s BEST Invest) and Phillip Capital Money Market Fund for non-investment related purposes. 

Average Past Return: Around 3 – 4%/annum

Pros: 

+ Higher return than FD;

+ Low barrier of entry (RM10 for BEST Invest);

+ No lock-in period (deposit & withdraw anytime).

Cons:

- Funds’ return can be impacted by low-interest rate, albeit they are still better than FD.

- Minimal amount of management & trustee fees will incur.


2. StashAway Simple 

StashAway Simple is a cash management service from robo-advisor StashAway. 

Essentially, StashAway Simple is also invested in Money Market Fund. However, I think it deserves its own place in this article due to its unique value proposition as shown below: 

Historical Return: Between 3.6 - 3.7%/annum (data taken from the historical performance of Eastspring Investments Islamic Income Fund*)

Projected Return: About 2.4%/annum (this is an estimated potential return and SHOULD NOT be compared to the historical returns of other funds)

Pros:

+ Lower fee structure compared to typical Money Market Funds (~0.165% vs ~0.5%/annum). There’s no management fee from StashAway though there’s a minor fee charged by the underlying fund manager.

+ Zero barrier of entry. You can literally start using StashAway Simple at any amount you want.

+ No lock-in period (deposit & withdraw anytime).

Cons:

- The cons listed under Money Market Funds.

*The underlying fund of StashAway Simple is Eastspring Investments Islamic Income Fund that invests in Islamic debt instruments offered by financial institutions. You can find out more about the fund HERE.

StashAway Simple is a financial product with a unique value proposition


3. Bond Funds

Bond Funds are mutual funds that mainly invest in bonds (okay haha what am I doing here). 

Essentially, when we invest in a bond fund, the money collected from investors will be pooled together to buy various bonds (ie. debts from governments and corporations) with different yields & maturities.  

Unlike Money Market Fund where the unit price is typically fixed, the value of Bond Fund units generally fluctuates inversely with interest rate.

In short, this means that the lower the interest rate, the higher the value of the bonds invested in a Bond Fund, which may lead to an increase in the value of the Bond Fund.

However, the opposite can also be true, where an increase in interest rate (which will definitely happen in the future) will lead to a drop in the value of bonds.

Return: Around 3-8%/annum, depending on the type of Bond Fund you invest in.

How to buy: Fund SuperMart (FSM)

Under FSM’s fund selector, select ‘Fixed Income’ under Assets Class. Then, if you want to filter your selections further, tick ‘Recommended Funds Only’ and click ‘Generate Funds Table’.

You’ll see a list of FSM’s recommended fixed income Bond and Sukuk Funds, and you can dive deeper into the particulars of the funds. 

Note: Let me know in the comment section below if you want me to write more about Bond Funds! 

 

Pros: 

+ Lower interest rate generally increases the value of bonds within a Bond Fund.

Cons:

- The opposite of pros can also be true.

- Higher min. investment of RM1,000 for most bond funds.

- Typical management & trustee fees apply.

p.s. In terms of risk, Money Market Funds are considered to be less risky compared to Bond Funds, but it also offers a lower yield in return.


4. Low to Medium Risk Portfolio on Robo-Advisors (eg. StashAway, Wahed, MyTheo)

If you are looking for something more diverse, putting your money in low to medium risk portfolio on Robo-Advisor platforms like StashAway, Wahed or MyTheo may be a good option.

Typically, in a low to medium risk portfolio, robo-advisor platforms will allocate the majority of the funds towards bonds and money market instruments, alongside a minimal allocation to equities and commodities.

In short, a low to medium risk robo-advisor portfolio will give you a good bond-focused allocation, with a dose of exposure to asset classes like equities and commodities.

Pros: 

+ Potentially higher returns due to exposure to the equity market.

+ Low barrier of entry

+ No lock-in period (deposit & withdraw anytime)

Cons:

- Potentially higher volatility and risk due to exposure to the equity market.


Robo-Advisor platforms having a healthy weightage of government, corporate bonds, and money market instruments in their low to medium risk portfolio.

p.s. Use my: StashAway Referral Code and get 50% off your management fees for 6 months, Wahed Referral Code (Code: YIXCHI1) and get RM10 bonus fund and MyTheo Referral Code and get 100% off your management fees for 3 months!


But hey, What About Amanah Saham Fixed Price Funds?

Now, some of you may have Amanah Saham Fixed Price Funds in mind, but there is ONE key reason why I’ll not include them in this discussion: 

Reason: High exposure to equities (risky asset class)

One of the criteria that I mentioned earlier in this article is that the options must have the majority of its exposure in low-risk assets.

As such, Amanah Saham Fixed Price Funds (ASB, ASB2, ASB3, ASM, ASM2, ASM3) do not fulfill the criteria as the majority of these funds are parked with equities

This simply means that the actual risk involved while putting our money in ASB is actually higher and hence in my opinion NOT a suitable choice for wealth preservation purposes.

Asset Allocation of ASB2 (Source: ASB2 Annual Report)

No Money Lah’s Verdict: Explore Your Options in this Low-Interest Rate Environment

With the low interest rate environment that we are living in right now, it is crucial for us to explore alternatives beyond FD to preserve the value of our hard-earned money.

Be it for emergency or savings, I think the options mentioned in this article will be suitable for most people to get started.

Have you start placing your money with any of the options mentioned above? Did I forget to mention any other options in this article?

Let me know in the comment section below – can’t wait to hear from you! 


Disclaimer: This article is produced for informational purposes only and SHOULD NOT be viewed as a buy/sell advice. Please seek financial professionals before making a financial decision.


Wahed 2020 Review: The First Halal-Investing Robo-Advisor in Malaysia with Huge Potential!

Late last year, I was introduced to Wahed, a robo-investing platform that prides itself on being the first halal investment robo-advisor in Malaysia.

Less than 4-months of launch in Malaysia (Wahed was started in New York), Wahed has been making an impression among fellow fintech and investment enthusiasts.

Being an enthusiast myself, I have also signed up for a Wahed portfolio to personally try it out myself, and got an RM10 FREE bonus while doing so  (remember to apply my promo code “YIXCHI1” to get the bonus!). 

In this article, let’s dive deep into Wahed, and see if this is a robo-advisor that you should invest in!


(1) First thing first: What is Wahed?

Wahed is a robo-advisor that helps invest your money into Shariah-compliant investments*.

What differentiates Wahed from other robo-advisors is that they are the first company that has received an Islamic Robo Advisory license from the Malaysian Securities Commission.

As such, Wahed also takes up an important role in fulfilling the Malaysian Muslim community that is looking for an investment platform that is aligned with their values of life.

*For readers who are unclear, Shariah-compliant investments are investments governed by the requirements of Shariah law and the principles of the Muslim religion.

Wahed Invest is one of the new robo-advisor platform in Malaysia.

(2) Who Certifies Wahed’s Shariah compliance?

Wahed’s Shariah review is done by their Shariah Advisor, Dr. Aznan Hasan.

Dr. Aznan is the President of the Association of Shariah Advisors in Islamic Finance & Deputy Chairman of Shariah Advisory Council of the Securities Commission (SC). He is also a former member of the Shariah Advisory Council of Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM).

Wahed also has Straightway Ethical Advisory LLC (a US-based Shariah financial advisory firm) to advise them on matters of Shariah compliance and Islamic financial ethics at the group level.

Source: Wahed’s Official Site


(3) How Wahed Invests Your Money?

Now, though positioning themselves as the forerunner of halal investing, Wahed is at its core a robo-advisor that invest on behalf of their users too, just like its competitor StashAway and Mytheo.

Hence, Wahed is definitely a robo-advisor that you should not overlook if you are looking to build your passive investing portfolio, regardless of your religion and background.

(a) Fund Management Methodology

Just like its robo-advisor competitors, Wahed’s fund management strategy is powered by its proprietary financial algorithms. This means that there is no way we can back-test the strategy ourselves aside from the information shown at Wahed’s official site.

Unlike StashAway’s ERAA methodology, there is very little mention of how exactly Wahed manages the users’ funds.

That said, Wahed does mention that its financial algorithms are derived from the Modern Portfolio Theory (MPT). Essentially, the idea behind MPT is to help an individual create optimal portfolios that are tailored to the needs of the user based on one’s risk tolerance.

Personally, it is a little bummer to see so few details about the investing methodology employed by Wahed on their website (Wahed, take note).

More explanation about the investing methodology behind the scene would be very helpful.

(b) Investment Instruments: 5 Major Asset Classes

The good thing, though, is Wahed does give us an idea of what they are using their users’ funds to invest in.

As per my experience**, there are 5 asset classes that Wahed will invest our funds in, namely:

    1. US Stocks (Wahed FTSE USA Shariah ETF)
    2. Malaysian Stocks (MyETF MSCI Malaysia Islamic Dividend)
    3. Sukuk (Islamic Bond) (RHB Islamic Bond Fund)
    4. Gold (TradePlus Shariah Gold Tracker)
    5. Cash

There are 6 different risk profile that you can choose from. Depending on your risk profile, there will be a difference in the allocation of your funds across these assets.

**Information on assets and asset allocation is accurate is per my record when I signed up for a Wahed account. Unfortunately, unlike StashAway, Wahed does not reveal the total number of asset classes that they can invest in.


(4) Fees Comparison: Competitive, But Can Be Better

One big advantage that robo-investing services have over conventional mutual funds is its fees.

Generally, while typical mutual funds have an average fee of 3-5% per year, robo-investing services charge only a fraction of the fee (<1%).

This is important, as a few percentage differences in fee could mean a lot to your return. Here is a simple calculation to give you an idea:

 RM100,000 at 5% fee per year = RM5,000 on fees.

RM100,000 at 1% fee per year = RM1,000 on fees (and no, robo-investing services offer lower fee than 1% at RM100,000).

The question now is, how are Wahed’s annual fees compared to the other presently available robo-investing platforms – StashAway and MyTheo?

Now, every robo-investing platform has its own tiers of pricing. Hence, to make my life (and yours) easier, I am comparing the fee in terms of the category of fund amount:

Full fee details: StashAway, Wahed, MyTheo.

Now, as you can see, Wahed’s annual fees are competitive, and it gets even cheaper when your fund exceeds RM500,000 and above.

That said, in terms of versatility of fees, I think StashAway is still the robo-advisor to beat.


DON’T MISS THIS: Click HERE to Get an EXCLUSIVE $5 (RM20) BONUS When You Fund Your Wahed Portfolio today (REMEMBER to apply my promo code “YIXCHI1”)!


(5) Customer Service: Up Your Game, Wahed!

At this point in the article, I would like to say that while lower fees are important, it is not everything. A lower fee that compromises the overall customer experience is a NO-NO.

After all, what’s the point if a company has a low fee but no one is attending to customers’ issues properly?

To test out Wahed’s customer experience, I sent out inquiries to all 3 channels of customer support (as stated available in the Support section of the app): Email, Phone & WhatsApp, all during office hours.

Firstly, Wahed’s response time for email is decent. However, I failed to reach out to the support team via call and it is also disappointing to see that there is no WhatsApp chat support available yet.

As a whole, I think Wahed has to really up their game to stay competitive in customer experience when competitor like StashAway is already providing more support channels for users to reach out to them.


(6) How to Open an Account?

Opening a Wahed account is simple and can be done in less than 10 minutes (Click HERE to install the Wahed app on your phone). And while doing so, remember to apply my promo code “YIXCHI1” to get an RM10 FREE Bonus when you fund your Wahed portfolio!

The account opening process is also straightforward. You will be asked about your investing goals and your savings in order to identify your risk profile.

Then, you will be recommended with one of the 6 portfolios from very conservative to very aggressive. Of course, you can also choose your own portfolio if you have a personal preference.

Once you completed all the procedures, it will take a few days to get your account verified and you are good to start!

You will be recommended a portfolio upon completion of your profile.

(7) What do I like About Wahed?

(a) Huge Market Potential

What Wahed is providing is truly one of its kind at the moment, and fits in well with the demographics of the majority Muslim community in Malaysia.

In short, Wahed is the to-go robo-advisor platform for people that are looking for Shariah-compliant investments.

(b) Help in Promoting Ethical Halal Investing in Malaysia

Given its unique positioning, Wahed is a great platform to promote halal investing to fellow Malaysian users regardless of religion and background – of which I like its core principles and concepts.


(8) What Could be Better?

(a) Customer Service needs Some Work

As discussed above, Wahed needs to put more effort to improve its customer service. That said, I do understand that Wahed has just launched in Malaysia (Oct 2019) and may need time to build up their Malaysian team.

On this matter, I will revisit Wahed’s customer service in my review next year and see if there’re any improvements.

(b) App UI needs Refurnishing

One thing that annoys me while using Wahed’s app is that the app interface seems to have issues showing the last letter and decimals of the word and numbers (eg. Overvie’X’ and RM100.’XX’). This may be something that Wahed will have to resolve with their backend team.

Wahed must improve its UI.

(c) Minimum Deposit of RM100

Unlike competitors like StashAway that has no minimum deposit, Wahed has a minimum deposit of RM100.

While this may not be a big issue, but it is definitely not as flexible as other robo-advisors around and I would love to see this minimum being lifted in the future.

(d) Only 1 Portfolio for each User (for Now)

As of the time of writing, there is no way for me to create another portfolio in Wahed other than the one I’ve created when I opened my account.

Meaning, I am not able to open a Moderate risk portfolio if I started off with an Aggressive risk Portfolio.

This is kind of a bummer because, in comparison, StashAway allows multiple portfolios of different risk profiles.


No Money Lah’s Verdict – A Robo-Advisor with Huge Potential

Is Wahed a good robo-investing platform?

Personally, I feel that Wahed has done a good job of positioning itself at the forefront of halal investing in the robo-advisor space.

Not only that, I’ve also heard good feedback from the Malaysian community, especially their awesome referral reward: Fund a minimum of RM100 and get RM10 FREE Bonus – Instant 20% Gain!.

If Wahed is able to enhance its customer service and user experience, I foresee that it will definitely give competitors like StashAway and Mytheo a good run of their money.

If you find this review on Wahed useful, my suggestion is to TAKE ACTION on your investments RIGHT NOW: Time wasted on inactions is more painful than money badly managed.

p


p.s. Which Robo-Advisor Should I Invest In?

Now, if you are wondering if you should go for one robo-advisor over another, why not try investing in these platforms and see which one fits you the best?

StashAway: Claim your EXCLUSIVE 50% off your fees for 6 months when you use my link HERE!

Mytheo: Enjoy FREE 3 months management fee when you use my link HERE!


Disclaimers:

  1. Past return is not indicative of future performance. (just like your mom may not be angry at you today doesn’t mean she will not get angry with you tomorrow) 
  2. Now, one thing that I have yet to comment is Wahed’s return. As Wahed is still new in Malaysia (since Oct. 2019), I cannot comment on the return – and neither you should take others’ words as it is. I will keep monitoring the return and give my feedback in my 2021 review. 
  3. This post may contain affiliate links that afford No Money Lah a small amount of commission should you sign up through the links.